Want Increased Control Over online Communications? Consider Wickr

July 9, 2012

If you’re tired of having your personal information, conversations, photos, texts, and video messages exploited by companies, used to embarrass you by frenemies, or pawed over by data collection services, Wickr’s an app worth considering.

The company’s founders have the credentials and the right motivation to build a tool that puts control of your communications squarely – and simply – in your own hands.  Kara Lynn Coppa, is a former defense contractor; Christopher Howell, is a former forensics investigator for the State of New Jersey; Robert Statica, is a director at the Center for Information Protection at the New Jersey Institute of Technology; and Nico Sell, is a security expert and longtime organizer for Defcon, an annual hacker convention.

Responding to questions during an interview, Ms. Sell said, “Right now, everyone is being tracked and traced in ways they don’t understand by numerous governments and corporations,” “Our private communications, by default, should be untraceable. Right now, society functions the other way around.”

Continuing, Ms. Sell said, “If my daughter wants to post a picture of our dog, Max, on Instagram, she shouldn’t have to know to turn the geo-location off,” “People have always asked me ‘How do I communicate securely and anonymously?’ There was never an easy answer, until now.”

Mr. Statica added to this point saying “There is no reason your pictures, videos and communications should be available on some server, where it can easily be accessed by who-knows-who, or what service, without any control over what people do with it.”

Amen to these views.

So what does Wickr offer?

Encrypted messaging – all messages – text, photos, video and audio – sent through the service are secured “by military-grade encryption… They can only be read by you and the recipients on the devices you authorize,” Wickr only stores the encoded result – and only for as long as needed for system continuity.

Self-destruct option – allows you to determine how long the people you communicate with can view the content – text, video, photos – before it is erased. (Recipients can however still capture a screenshot of the content, but the team behind Wickr is looking for ways to notify the sender if a screenshot is taken).

Total phone wipe – one of the risks of recycling cellphones is that you can’t easily erase the phone’s hard drive which enables criminals (and forensic investigators) to recreate your content. Wickr addresses this issue with an anti-forensics mechanism that erases deleted content by overwriting the metadata and rendering indecipherable.

Anonymity on Wickr – the service takes your privacy so seriously they don’t even know your username, you aren’t forced to share your email address or any other personal information that could identify you to the service or to others. Instead, your information is “irreversibly encoded with multiple rounds of salted cryptographic hashing prior to being sent to our servers. Even we cannot determine the actual values based on the hashed values we store.”

Free to use – you might think a service like this could put a hefty price on your privacy, instead the company has chosen to use the “freemium” business model that charges only for premium service features like sending files to large groups or sending large files.

NOTE: I am not associated in any way with this app, nor do I know any of the individuals behind it. While it’s rare I endorse a product, the philosophy behind the service is fabulous, and the tools are something every consumer needs to protect themselves and their privacy.

The next step is for every consumer to demand this same level of respect and security of EVERY online service with whom they interact. 

Want to learn more? Read Wickr’s FAQ

 

Linda